American Redoubt

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The American Redoubt movement is an initiative created by James Wesley Rawles of SurvivalBlog.com where citizens are encouraged to pull up stakes and to move to a more and free state (Real America) -- to vote with their feet -- in the Intermountain-West.

Map of The American Redoubt

The American Redoubt refers to this strategic relocation movement first proposed in 2011 by best-selling survivalist novelist and survival blogger James Wesley Rawles which designates three states in the northwestern United States (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming), and adjoining portions of two other states (eastern Oregon, and eastern Washington) as a safe haven for survivalists, conservatives, Christians and Jews.[1]

The American Redoubt concept was endorsed by former presidential candidate Rev. Chuck Baldwin, who had recently relocated his entire extended family to western Montana. It also soon inspired the launch of a weekly survival podcast by Christian Libertarian journalist John Jacob Schmidt, called Radio Free Redoubt ([2]), as well as a volunteer network of amateur radio operators called AmRRON (the American Redoubt Radio Operators Network) established in 2012.

The second podcast is by Alex Barron (http://alexanderbarron.com), an African American Catholic redoubter, who founded the Charles Carroll Society podcast (https://charlescarrollsociety.com). Alex is the self-proclaimed Bard of the American Redoubt who speaks from a Traditional Catholic, Constitutional Conservative, American Patriot viewpoint. Alex says, "Jim Rawles coined the term, but it is actually a simple concept, it is called political migration. There are many groups who have done this over the years; Protestants and other minority religious groups escaping the Catholic church in Europe (I guess that would actually be religious migration but you get the point), liberty-minded people escaping the Protestant King of England. Native Americans moving West to escape the European colonization (I guess forced ethnic cleansing, but again I hope you get the point). Americans of African descent escaping the South (racial migration?). Many, many groups move because of various reasons including political reasons. The American Redoubt is Christian and Jewish liberty-loving traditionalist politically migrating from militant progressive secular states." [3]

Contents

Texas

Parts of Texas can be considered as the Texas Redoubt.

Tennessee

For those who are more attached to the East Coast and can't easily migrate to the American Redoubt in the Intermountain-West, we recommend the blog of the inspirational M.D. Creekmore who posted Joel M. Skousen, author of Strategic Relocation - North American Guide to Safe Places, on the Tennessee Cumberland Plateau solution to the “The East Coast Retreat Dilemma”: http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/redoubt-of-the-east http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/news-eastern-redoubt-tennessee-cumberland-plateau/

“As a relocation specialist and designer, I found safe retreat locations and helped clients develop high security homes in every state of the union and you can too. The concept that anyone caught East of the Mississippi River is doomed is only partially valid and highly exaggerated. You can achieve a significantly higher level of safety going beyond the Appalachians to the high plateau regions of Tennessee and Kentucky. This massive and relatively unpopulated area is called the Cumberland Plateau—most of which falls within the state of Tennessee.” Joel M. Skousen (http://joelskousen.com/strategic.html) is a relocation specialist and author of “Strategic Relocation North American Guide to Safe Places.” http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/redoubt-east-aka-cumberland-plateau-ot-tennessee/

See Also

References

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Redoubt accessed January 17, 2014
  2. http://www.radiofreeredoubt.com accessed January 17, 2014
  3. https://charlescarrollsociety.com/2013/01/28/the-american-redoubt-who-the-players-are accessed January 17, 2014

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